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Entries in politics (2)

Monday
Feb222016

Connections and globalization

We enjoy -- and encourage you to explore -- Catalyst Fellow Parag Khanna's exploration of how shifting demographics and increased global connectivity are reshaping civilization.

His 2011 book, How to Run The World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance, contemplates a world in which non-state actors have as much influence on the course of world events as countries do -- in many ways similar to the 16th century.

More recently, Khanna has focused on connectivity and how it redefining how we approach issues of commerce and government. His new book, due out in April, is titled Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization, views current market trends and international conflicts through the lens of how each is related to connective infrastructure. This was also the theme of his 2016 TED talk (while waiting for the video to post, you can read the Tech Insider review). "Connectivity, not sovereignty," Khanna says, "has become the organizing principle of the human species."

And although the transformation can appear chaotic, Khanna is optimistic about the future -- that beneath the chaos of a world that appears to be falling apart is a new foundation of connectivity pulling it together.

 -- Bruno Roche and Clara Shen

 

Thursday
Jun182015

Holism, a new economic approach to address world issues

Image Source: Huffington PostA recent article in The Guardian explores a new report released by U.S. think tank Capital Institute, which we find to be very interesting. The report suggests that a holistic approach to the economy is vital in order to avoid social, environmental and economic collapse. The institute argues that the world needs to look beyond the standard views of capitalism or socialism, and explore the "hard science of holism" in order to debunk outdated views held by both the left and the right.

Holism, a term coined by author Jan Smuts in his 1926 book, Holism and Evolution, is defined as the tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of parts. Under this theory, focusing too closely on the individual parts of an organism could get in the way of understanding the organism as a whole.

Capital Institute founder, former JP Morgan managing director John Fullerton, says:

Society's economic worldview has relied on breaking complex systems down into simpler parts in order to understand and manage them.

For example, a traditional economic view generally views automobile manufacturing separately from the mineral mining, petroleum production and workers on which it relies, relates The Guardian. This runs the risk of overlooking the impact that automobile manufacturing has on the environment, politics and economics in a region. Taking a holistic view, on the other hand, takes into account the entire chain of cause and effect leading both toward and away from automobile manufacturing.

The report warns that the consequences of the current economic worldview are boundless, creating a multitude of challenges ranging from climate change to political instability. The institute argues that what the world needs now is a new systems-based mindset built around the notion of a regenerative economy, focusing on the whole, not the parts.

According to The Guardian, this type of mindset could lead to close analysis of supply chains, investigations of the effects of water use, circular economy initiatives, community economic development work or a host of other sustainability efforts. It also turns long-held beliefs on their head. Rather than approaching global economics from a capitalism-or-socialism perspective, it would approach global economics from a capitalism-and-socialism perspective.

What are your thoughts on the current way of viewing economic systems, and this new notion of taking a holistic approach to the economy?

-- Bruno Roche